Articles & Downloads / 2018


Amy Barr

Why 'forced hugs' at Ted Baker have caused a big issue

11 December 2018

More than 2,600 people have signed a petition calling for the end of ‘forced hugs’ and ‘harassment’ at fashion retailer Ted Baker. The company has been under significant pressure over the past week after a series of revelations from current and former employees accused founder and CEO of the company, Ray Kelvin, of a culture of “forced hugging” in the workplace. Read More


Rachel Toner

Russian Roulette or Mexican Shoot Out in the Boardroom?

28 November 2018

Shareholder disputes can be thorny, but to suggest you resolve them by resorting to Russian roulette or a Mexican shoot out may seem extreme. However, these are methods for disputing shareholders to agree a share price so one party can exit. When a dispute arises creating a deadlock in decision making, the difficulties can escalate to the detriment of the company. It is therefore vital the shareholders consider the ways which they can break deadlock before damage to the company is irreparable. Read More


Michael Duffy

Canary Wharf v European Medicines - can a Tenant terminate it's lease early in light of Brexit?

20 November 2018

There is still a massive amount of uncertainty surrounding Brexit and its implication for businesses in the UK. In the context of commercial leases, one interesting case is the ongoing saga between Canary Wharf Group and the European Medicines Agency. The European Medical Agency (the Tenant of the premises in question) are arguing that its 25 year lease of its London Headquarters at Canary Wharf has become frustrated. The European Medicines Agency is arguing that under the Doctrine of frustration, they should be released from their liability under the lease as they are unable to perform their obligations under the lease, due to events occurring outside their control. The event outside its control is of course Brexit which they are saying has ‘frustrated’ their lease with Canary Wharf Group. Read More


Louise McAloon

Can an employee refuse to work additional hours in the lead up to Christmas?

14 November 2018

Whilst employers will invariably endeavour to individually consult with their staff with a view to reaching agreement regarding working additional hours in the lead up to Christmas, the case of Edwards v Bramble Foods Ltd ET/2601556/2015 is a salutary reminder that for those employees who might unreasonably refuse to work some extra hours, an employment tribunal has previously decided that the dismissal of an employee who refused to work extra hours before Christmas was fair. Read More


Janeen McKay

What can you do to protect your home when planning for the future?

08 November 2018

With the estimated annual cost of care home fees being £41,000 it is not surprising that many people are considering their own positions to try and protect their assets which they have worked their whole lives to build up. The most valuable asset usually being the family home. Northern Ireland residents with savings, investments and or property, to include the value of their home, with a value greater than £23,250 will not be eligible for financial assistance from their local Health and Social Care Trust and will be obliged to meet the full cost of their residential or nursing care. The main concerns for these individuals and their families is that they will have to sell their home to pay for their care and that their children's inheritance will be reduced. Read More


John Kelly

Why you can’t always have your cake and eat it

17 October 2018

The Supreme Court has given its long awaited decision in the so-called “gay cake” case, ruling unanimously that Ashers Bakery did not discriminate against gay rights activist Gareth Lee, who had been successful in the County Court and then at the Northern Ireland Court of Appeal. Read More


Clare Curran

Does bad behaviour in a marriage result in a larger award to the spouse?

16 October 2018

One aspect of divorce that surprises many clients when they come to discuss a marriage breakdown is how bad behaviour on the part of their spouse, perhaps in the form of an adulterous relationship or some other form of unreasonable behaviour, is looked at specifically in terms of division of the matrimonial assets. In many scenarios, the courts take the view that such behaviour will have little to no bearing on the financial settlement, which can be difficult for a spouse, who feels wronged as a result of their partner’s conduct, to hear. Read More


Jonathan Duncan

Hearing Loss – an occupational health hazard

03 October 2018

Whilst hearing loss is often seen as an inevitable consequence of ageing, and usually merits no more than a cursory “I’m going deaf”, it should always be remembered that hearing problems can be embarrassing and cause considerable difficulties in performing day to day tasks for those affected. Read More


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